Hackers are beginning to target Apple iPhone users by sending them text messages that appear to be from Apple. The text message have messages indicating that a lost device has been found and use URLs that have Apple product names in them such as: apple.com-support[.]id, apple.com-findlocation[.]id, apple.com-sign[.]in, apple.com-isupport[.]in, icloud.com-site-log[.]in

There is a widespread belief that Apple products are inherently more secure than Android or Windows devices. Inherent security doesn’t matter here, if the hacker can convince you to install their viruses and malware it is game over for you.

Of course, other companies, especially Microsoft, have been battling this for years. The part that is unique here is the SMS delivery and Apple-specific targeting.

How do you respond? After 20 years of telling people not to click on links, we’ve discovered that doesn’t work: they are going to click.

  1. Turn on multi factor authentication for everywhere that supports it. Do not limit this to the “important” sites.
  2. Store information on systems that use AI to detect usage that is different from your, unique, usage and alert you when something is amiss, like the credit card companies do for travel.
  3. Assume that people are going click and design your security around that, instead of assuming that they can and will accurately determine the safety of links.
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Apple just announced a battery replacement program for certain 13 inch MacBook Pro’s (non touch bar) manufactured between October 2016 and October 2017.

From Apple:

Apple has determined that, in a limited number of 13-inch MacBook Pro (non Touch Bar) units, a component may fail causing the built-in battery to expand. This is not a safety issue and Apple will replace eligible batteries, free of charge. Affected units were manufactured between October 2016 and October 2017 and eligibility is determined by the product serial number.

You can see if your laptop is affected here. All managed services customers of JM Addington and Kairos Dynamic Digital Managed Services have already had their serial numbers run across the the program by JM Addington staff.

Find more reporting by Ars Technica here.

We recently came across this error, “A critical software update is required for your Mac.” Attempting to install this update would result in another error, “A critical software update is required for your Mac, but an error was encountered while installing this update.”

Unlike some others on the web we found that simply reinstalling the OS did not resolve the issue. However, booting into safe mode (left shift button while powering on) would work. From there, one can create a Time Machine backup. After we successfully backed up the machine we went into the recovery console (Apple+R on boot), ERASED the “Macintosh HD” partition and then re-installed.

This still prompted for the update but we were able to successfully install it. After a fresh install, Migration Assistant loaded the fresh Time Machine backup back onto the machine.