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Yahoo! was hacked multiple times in the 2010’s. In the worse case, literally every single account was compromised. If you had opened a Yahoo! account before 2016 your info — including your password — is available on the Dark Web.

Yahoo! is working on winding down the class action lawsuit against it. For US and Israeli consumers with Yahoo! accounts during the hacked times 2 years of credit monitoring is available.

Breaches listed from the settlement notification:

  • 2012 Data Security Intrusions: From at least January through April 2012, at least two different malicious actors accessed Yahoo’s internal systems.  The available evidence, however, does not reveal that user credentials, email accounts, or the contents of emails were taken out of Yahoo’s systems.
  • 2013 Data Breach: In August 2013, malicious actors were able to gain access to Yahoo’s user database and took records for all existing Yahoo accounts—approximately three billion accounts worldwide. The records taken included the names, email addresses, telephone numbers, birth dates, passwords, and security questions and answers of Yahoo account holders. As a result, the actors may have also gained access to the contents of breached Yahoo accounts and, thus, any private information contained within users’ emails, calendars, and contacts.
  • 2014 Data Breach: In November 2014, malicious actors were able to gain access to Yahoo’s user database and take records of approximately 500 million user accounts worldwide. The records taken included the names, email addresses, telephone numbers, birth dates, passwords, and security questions and answers of Yahoo account holders, and, as a result, the actors may have also gained access to the contents of breached Yahoo accounts, and thus, any private information contained within users’ emails, calendars, and contacts.
  • 2015 and 2016 Data Breach: From 2015 to September 2016, malicious actors were able to use cookies instead of a password to gain access into approximately 32 million Yahoo email accounts.

We just finished writing about an IT provider of managed services in Colorado who was hacked, and in turn all or most of their customers were hacked as well.

Well, it’s another day and this time the story comes from California.

Synoptek, a California business that provides cloud hosting and IT management services to more than a thousand customers nationwide, suffered a ransomware attack this week that has disrupted operations for many of its clients, according to sources. The company has reportedly paid a ransom demand in a bid to restore operations as quickly as possible.

Irvine, Calif.-based Synoptek is a managed service provider that maintains a variety of cloud-based services for more than 1,100 customers across a broad spectrum of industries, including state and local governments, financial services, healthcare, manufacturing, media, retail and software. The company has nearly a thousand employees and brought in more than $100 million in revenue in the past year, according to their Web site.

Much like other ransomware gangs operating today, the crooks behind Sodiniokibi seem to focus on targeting IT providers.

Every single IT provider is now a major target, because by successfully compromising a single IT provider attackers compromise dozens or hundreds of other companies in the process.

If you aren’t asking your current IT provider what they are doing to make sure that their own house is in order, you aren’t doing your due diligence.

Krebs on Security writes about a hacking incident in Colorado late in 2019:

A Colorado company that specializes in providing IT services to dental offices suffered a ransomware attack that is disrupting operations for more than 100 dentistry practices, KrebsOnSecurity has learned.

We’ve started talking about this in verbal conversations with prospects: today your biggest risk may be your IT provider.

Most IT providers (MSPs) put an RMM agent or remote-control software on each computer that they manage. This agent then connects back to a central source where the MSP can push out security updates, backups and other such measures to keep customers secure.

However, if the MSP’s central source is hacked then it is easily possible for all of their customers to be hacked at the same time.

The active targetting of MSPs is going to reach epidemic levels soon.

We’ll unpack what all of these means in a later post. For now, the top takeaway is that you should be asking your IT provider (1) how they are securing their own house, (2) what changes they have made / are making as the security threats change.

5G is inherently insecure according to a new article by longtime cybersecurity industry expert Bruce Schneier.

Schneier is one of the stars of the security field, a longtime activist with nearly a crystal ball for understanding how technology is going to unfold. An important topic for him right now is the security of the cell phone networks given the central role that 5G will play in industry and business over the next decade.

His article raises up a central question that should already be at the forefront of business owner’s minds: How do you secure your company’s data on networks that are inherently insecure? Even without 5G, your data is already accessed over public networks that are owned and operated by Starbucks, McDonald’s, your vendor’s guest wireless, or any wireless network that employee connects his or her laptop or phone to.

This will only be the case increasingly in the future. Data needs to be accessed from everywhere, and everywhere the networks are insecure. But that doesn’t relieve you of your responsibility to keep both your confidential company information safe as well as the confidentiality of your clients data. For small businesses, this can be a significant hurdle to overcome.

Security and data safety are at the front of how we manage IT. It is possible to build data structures that are robust, meaningfully secure, and can alert you if it looks like they’ve been breached. Today it is even possible for the smallest businesses to implement these systems, but most don’t know how to or that they even exist at all.

We would love to talk to you about how you can better secure your data, your client’s data, and even be what sets you apart between your company and your competitors. Email us at info@JMAddington.com to schedule a free and confidential consultation on cybersecurity.

Hackers are beginning to target Apple iPhone users by sending them text messages that appear to be from Apple. The text message have messages indicating that a lost device has been found and use URLs that have Apple product names in them such as: apple.com-support[.]id, apple.com-findlocation[.]id, apple.com-sign[.]in, apple.com-isupport[.]in, icloud.com-site-log[.]in

There is a widespread belief that Apple products are inherently more secure than Android or Windows devices. Inherent security doesn’t matter here, if the hacker can convince you to install their viruses and malware it is game over for you.

Of course, other companies, especially Microsoft, have been battling this for years. The part that is unique here is the SMS delivery and Apple-specific targeting.

How do you respond? After 20 years of telling people not to click on links, we’ve discovered that doesn’t work: they are going to click.

  1. Turn on multi factor authentication for everywhere that supports it. Do not limit this to the “important” sites.
  2. Store information on systems that use AI to detect usage that is different from your, unique, usage and alert you when something is amiss, like the credit card companies do for travel.
  3. Assume that people are going click and design your security around that, instead of assuming that they can and will accurately determine the safety of links.

ToTok, a social media app that recently took off in international popularity, is the United Arab Emirates actually spying on your according to a new article from the New York Times.

Officially it’s supposed to be a secure way to communicate with family and friends, even in countries that block similar tools. However, is actually a spying tool the United Arab Emirates government.

While both Google and Apple have removed it from their stores it will not be automatically uninstalled from your phone.

We understand that a number of readers of our blog are not social media aficionados. However, given the widespread scope of the spying of this app we highly recommend that you send this article out as a PSA to your employees who are digital natives.

The app appears to track messages, analyze user calls, analyze user contacts and track location. And that’s just what we know so far. This raises another question. Given practical and regulatory risks of such data, and creating vulnerability for your company through your employees phones, how are you securing your company on these devices? 

Iran is targeting industrial control systems, according to Microsoft security researchers and reported by Ars Technica. The scale of the attempted hacking is incredible, with the Iranian group targeting about 2000 organizations per month.

Motivations behind the attacks are not yet clear. While the US government was concerned that Iran may retaliate in the cybersecurity space. In response, the late December drone strike on their general, this appears to have begun before that. It’s possible that this is laying the groundwork for a larger attack later on.

Given the number of organizations that directly and indirectly support Y12 and Oak Ridge National Laboratory it seems prudent to assume that some of these organizations that are targeted include those in East Tennessee.

It’s a great example of why we block Internet traffic for our managed customers from countries such as Iran. While not a panacea, it goes a long way toward securing the network.

If you’re interested in having a conversation with us about how to better secure your network. Give us a call at 865-240-2716.

You need to buy CyberSecurity insurance and you need to buy it today. And no, I’m don’t even sell it, this is just a PSA.

First, small businesses are targets for hackers today. 20% of SMBs reported that they’ve been a victim of a ransomware attack (Datto, 2019) and 60% of all cyber attacks are aimed at SMBs.

You should let that last sentence sink in for a minute, you are being targeted.

Second, rates for CyberSecurity coverage have historically been low, pennies of pennies on the dollar. Managed services providers, like JM Addington, are already seeing rates rise across the nation to purchase this type of coverage, with deductibles increasing as well. Today, you can still lock-in affordable rates. For next year it is an open question.

In addition the better your security the lower your rates are and the less likely you are to have to use the insurance in the first. I’d love to talk to you today about three easy things you can do to increase the security of your business, call me at 865-544-8045 (direct) or email jonathan.addington@jmaddington.com.